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inspire us. i said no, mr. mandela, you inspire us. so there was this unbelievable relationship between what was happening in america and what would happen in south africa. we would say from time to time the struggle in birmingham, the struggle in selma is inaccept raable from the struggle in sharpville. >> one of the reasons i wanted to talk to you today congressman was reading about and thinking about and trying to understand the importance of those decisions made by mandela and other apartheid leaders after sharpville, when they decided non-violence was not enough, they have been so committed to nonviolence, even in the face of incredible brutality, they needed some sort of military response as well. never ended up being the khai part of their response to apartheid, but they made that hard decision. how international were those discussions about the importance of non-violence and whether or not it was enough to overthrow governments and to change the world? >> here in america and around the world, there was ongoing discussion about the way of peace, the way of love, the way of non-vi
to me, john lewis, i know all about you. i follow you, you inspired us. and i said, no, mr. mandela, you inspired us. so that was just unbelievable relationship between what was happening in america and what would happen in south africa. we would say from time to time, the struggle in birmingham, the struggle in selma is inseparable from the struggle in sharpville. >> one of the reasons i wanted to talk to you today, congressman, was reading about and thinking about and trying to understand the importance of those decisions that was made by mandela and other anc leaders and other antiapartheid leaders after sharpville, when they decided that nonviolence wasn't enough. they had been committed to nonviolence in the way that you have been so overtly committed to nonviolence, throughout your life, throughout those struggles, even in the face of incredible physical brutality, and they decided when they saw those people massacred, they needed some kind of military response as well. never ended up being a key response of their response to apartheid, but they made that hard decision. how interna
africa. >> we are one country. we are one people. >> one excludes the religious leaders, mr. mandela is the greatest person to have walked the face of the earth in human history. >> reporter: an icon not only for his fellow countrymen -- >> viva mandela! viva! >> reporter: -- but for the entire world. "nelson mandela." >> ladies and gentlemen. >> this is "headliners "headliners & legends" with lester holt. >> he is lauded the world over as a man of peace, a champion for the downtrodden. he suffered at the hands of racism and endured decades in prison only to emerge with his dignity intact, his spirit unbroken freedom fighter, ex-prisoner, nation builder. nelson mandela's legacy serves as a shining example not only for the people of the world today but for generations to come. >> reporter: nelson mandela's life begins far away from the turmoil, struggles and ultimate triumphs that will define his life. here in the transsky province of south africa, 550 miles south of johannesburg, mandela is born on july 18th, 1918. the name he is given will prove in a sense prophetic. >> nelson mande
mr. obama travelled to see the cell where mandela was held for nearly two decades. he described his relationship to the man he and many others affectionately called madiba. >> he is a personal hero and i don't think i am u meek in that regard. he's a hero for the world. >> back this south africa, the mood is part sadness, but part celebration. crowds gathered to remember nelson mandela who changed the world by committing his to the freedom of the south african people. >> i have nothing but deep gratitude they have given to me as an individual and let me state this. they were able to achieve anything, i know that this is because i am the servant of the people of south africa. >> it has been more than two decades since nelson mandela walked out of prison, but for those who lived through it, it seemed to be a piece of a larger puzzle. consider when mandela was freed, we were less than a year removed from china's tianamen square. the berlin wall came down the previous november. it was a fleeting moment in history, but for a time it showed humanity around the world was headed in the righ
. >> the government has taken a firm decision to release mr. mandela unconditionally. >> reporter: mandela emerged behind bars without bitterness to resume his campaign. >> africa. >> nelson mandela set aside his personal freedom for our personal freedoms. >> reporter: as south africa's first black president mandela remained a humble man, taking delight in a new york ticker tape parade. dancing at a concert in his honor. meeting with world leaders and his civil rights hero. as promised he stepped down as president of south africa after serving just one term. >> be south africa has been a despottic state throughout almost the whole of the 20th century. mandela is one of the best and optimistic qualities that he has to the people of south africa. >> reporter: by all accounts the measure of this man can be taken by what he wants to be remembered for. here lies nelson mandela said, a man who has done his duty on earth. >> here with us now, a giant of civil rights. you got a chance to interview president mandela in february of 1990 after he came out of prison after 27 years. how did you finds him? how
's death on thursday. he was 95 years old. mr. mandela's body is being prepared for his lying in state later this week. on tuesday, there will be an official memorial service in johannesburg. >>> number five, police are searching for four people believed to be behind the killing of an american school teacher. officials say 33-year-old ronnie smith was gunned down while he was jogging in the libyan city of benghazi on thursday. smith moved to libya just about a year and a half ago. he was teaching there. he was planning to return home to his family this month. >>> merrill newman, a veteran of the korean war, 85 years old, is back to see his family today. cnn's paula hancocks in seoul looks at newman's role in the korean conflict. >> reporter: putting on military fatigues in seoul, former members talk about the korean war. now in their 80s, these men were part of an anti-militant guerilla group. they say released american citizen merrill newman was one of their leaders. newman used to send orders to us indicating which island to infiltrate and occupy. then used to work on combined operat
one of its great moral leaders. >> despite his long years of captivity, mr. mandela left prison with his mind closed to any settling of scores and his heart open to those he had fought against. >> mandela in his fight for equality influenced not just world leaders, but also the people of the world. >> it's been an inspiration for generations growing up. he stood for the civil rights, not just people in south africa but people around the world and his legacy goes on. >> reporter: people here continuing to stop to pay their respects. some shedding tears. one note read, quote. thank you for creating a pathway to freedom for all of us, a message that is being heard around the world. michaela? >> thank you, erin. so many felt he was fighting for their freedom as well. freedom from poverty, oppression, whatever. >> i met some kids in south africa that said he is like the madiba. they feel like someone they have a personal connection with and vital to them. >> he was known for visiting dignitaries, he would go around and greet the workers first to shake sure he spent time with them fir
of dignity for the african decent. his long walk to freedom, mr. mandela's constant fight for equality personified what my father often said injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere. we showed briefly a second ago in new york city the apollo theatre marquis honors mandela. mayor bookberg announced he'll open a high school in honor of mandela. how much impact do you think mandela's life and times have on the civil rights movement and certainly during '80s and '90s when advocates demanded sanctions against apartheid in south africa. >> how much did it have? >> how much did it raise the credibility? >> tremendously. the fact the united states came on board. fortunately the united states came on board. it might have been a little late some would say. if you looked at other country they had come on board much earlier. what the united states did, students and universities started to say we want to divest our holdings in south africa. that was huge. when you impact a nation economically, then the community has to pay attention. business had to pay attention and say maybe these pol
that is emanating from there. i have to say that i read with a chuckle about the first time that you met mr. mandela back in 1990. i want you to tell people because you were literally star struck. >> i absolutely was. i've been blessed to be around some phenomenal people, some great leaders, but there's no one like nelson mandela. so yes, the first time i was in his company was immediately after we had organized a glorious ticker tape for him parade down broadway in manhattan. we took him into city hall in new york, and had found myself alone with him in the mayor's office. and i didn't realize that i had been just staring at the man for probably ten minutes till i heard a voice say, excuse me, young man. can i trouble you for that glass of water. i realized that he had probably asked me several times for some water after being out in the heat and this long parade. i raced, got him the water and darn near spilled it all over him, i was so incredibly nervous and in awe of him. even though when you were around him, you were in awe, there was something about him that will created an accessibility, too.
interviewer. he said, mr. mandela, about the communists, and madiba said, well, they were the only ones that helped had us, next question. >> interesting. >> and moved right ahead. >> you afforded him a ticker tape parade down the canyon of heroes, which was reserved for very few. that's like amelia earhart, john glen, jesse owens. that was extraordinary. did he understand the significance of that? did he get it? >> oh, yes. he was a very wise man, and he understood the significance. later when we had a gathering at yankees sta yankees stadium, it must have been 60,000, 70,000 people. i put the yankee jacket around his shoulders and the cap, and he looked out at the crowd and said, now you know who i am. i am a yankee. and that went around the world. george steinbrenner was so impressed he said, i'll pay for it. >> you know that was impressive he was going to put out for that. how about the reception in harlem? what was that like? >> it was amazing. he spoke at 125th and lenox avenue, the site from which people like malcolm x and martin luther king and many had spoken earlier. here's th
moments with us tonight. thank you so much. >> i thank you very much, mr. anderson cooper. thank you, god bless you. >> how awesome is she? much has been made of nelson mandela's talent. the 1995 rugby world cup, remarkable, mandela wearing the uniform of a team adored by white africaners as a symbol of apartheid. that resinated on and off the playing field. or in gary players case, the golf course. he was moved by mandela and a 1966 sports illustrated profile john under wood says he feels critics are not aware how the black natives of south africa are. there are growing children who will some day be ready for the responsibility of adulthood but in the meantime must be given guidance in christian compassion. the same year the player writes he lives in a country which is quote the product of its instinct and ability to maintain civilized values and standards amongst the alien bar barrens. the gary player today is not the gary player of 1966. we spoke earlier. >>> gary, you tell a remarkable story about the first time you met nelson mandela after he was released from prison. explain what h
mandela with great fondness and great respect, but few knew him as well as bill clinton. joining us now, the former president of the united states, bill clinton. mr. president, thanks very much for sharing some thoughts on this special day. >> i'm glad to do it, wolf. >> what was it like the first time you met nelson mandela? >> well, i was excited. i felt almost like i was 20 years old again. it was at the democratic convention in new york. i was about to be nominated for president and former mayor david dinkins, a long-time supporter of mandela's, brought him up to our room where he met with hillary, chelsea and me. we hit it off right away. he was there really because he was an incredibly loyal person to anyone who supported him and the anc during his long imprisonment and democrats had supported sanctions on south africa so he wanted to be there, he wanted to be at our convention. he later came to the inauguration. and then hillary and vice president gore led a delegation to his inauguration in '94 and just five months later, he came to the united states on a state visit. that's whe
stunning, saying thicks like go home, ted, you're drunk. he, mandela, was communist terrorist and targeted people for no other reason than being white. stunned to see you support this scumb scumbag, mr. cruz. he was a communist, a huge supporter of abortion. putting him in the same language of stalin, fdr, who are also dead and don't deserve a eulogy either. what does that tell us about the generations reflecting on this? >> shocking comments. these are ted cruz's ostensible supporters. how incredibly disturbing must it be for americans to read that, to say this is -- this vein of political thought, however large or small it is, exists in our country. >> i hope it's disturbing to us. >> i hope so. >> i'm mostly disturbed that maybe it isn't disturbing to us. >> obviously americans who agree with it, they're out there. i can't imagine it's a very large population, but it saez lot about people have asked for a long time what's the racial perspective of tea party members. unfortunately this is the perspective of some of them. >> remember, where you started the conversation about dr. king, i w
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13